Monday, November 24, 2014
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Books


David Meerman Scott's book is essential reading for anybody who plans to work in marketing or PR after today.

 

Want to know how blogging got going and why it's important? Scoble and Israel show all in "Naked Conversations."

 

Need more memorable quotes? Just do it with Chip and Dan Heath.

 

Wonder why some websites work and others don't? What about yours?

 

Many people have a tough time communicating under pressure. Marian can help.

 

People sleeping through your PowerPoints? Cliff will help you awaken them.

 

 

Here we’ll post some information on our latest additions to the Resources page, and some other stuff that we think may be worthy of your time and interest …

On the right are some articles you may find useful.

Questions Reporters May Ask is in three parts. Part 1 covers crises, Part 2 includes events involving terrorism or bio-terrorism and Part 3 covers flu pandemics. All are designed to help people prepare for the inevitable questions so that they can have answers ready--assuming of course that answers are available.

The Generic Media Policy may help those organizations that don't now have a media policy in developing one. Every organizations should have a media policy to assure that messages are correct and consistent.

Human Factors includes a number of concerns for organizations operating in a crisis -- things they may not think to do when faced with major business and operational issues, but that are just as important for critical audiences.

Government Blogging reveals how governors, members of Congress, fire and police chiefs and other agencies are using blogging to enhance internal and external communications.

The New Rules of PR is a much-abbreviated version of David Meerman Scott's treatise on the subject. (See his book on the left.) While it does not replace the book, which we think is one of the most important books on marketing and PR to come along in ages, you can sample his ideas in this free download. But then please take time to read the book.

 

On the left are some current books we've found useful.

Books listed here are recommended in our media training and crisis communication workshops. Just click on the image of the book you're interested in and you'll be magically transported to Amazon.com where you'll find reviews, etc. We suspect they'd be willing to part with one or more if you're interested. When you're finished at Amazon hit the "back" button and you'll be back here. We'll wait.

If you'd like automatic notification when we add to or update our Resources list, click on the appropriate button below and we'll notify your RSS aggregator.

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Articles
   Crisis Questions

   Bioterror Questions

   Pandemic Flu Questions

   Human Factors

   Generic Media Policy

   Government Blogging

   The New Rules of PR

Press Releases
   Coming - Stay tuned

Videos
    Sony's Embarrassing Press Conference


First written more than fifteen years ago for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), this revised version is a concise guide to dealing with traditional media. It is now available for a very nominal charge directly through the National Public Health Information Coalition (NPHIC) , which retains all proceeds from its sale.